Who Pays Child Support After a Divorce?

The parent who has primary custody of the child is typically the one who receives child support payments from the other parent. In Arkansas, child support is calculated based on a number of factors, including each parent’s income, the amount of time each parent spends with the child, and any special needs or expenses the child may have.

How Is Child Support Calculated in Arkansas?

In Arkansas, child support is calculated using a statewide formula that takes into account each parent’s income and the amount of time each parent spends with the child (known as the “parenting time percentage”). The formula also takes into account any special needs or expenses the child may have.

To calculate child support in Arkansas, you will need to know the following information:

  • Each parent’s gross income (income before taxes and other deductions)
  • The parenting time percentage for each parent (the amount of time each parent spends with the child)
  • Any special needs or expenses the child may have

Once you have this information, you can use the Arkansas Child Support Calculator to calculate child support. Contact our law firm to learn more about child support and how it may be calculated in your situation.

What If My Income Changes?

If your income changes, you can ask the court to modify your child support order. To do this, you will need to file a “motion to modify” with the court that issued your original child support order. You will also need to show that your income has changed by a significant amount.

If you think your ex is hiding income to avoid paying child support, you can ask the court to “impute” (assign) income to your ex. To do this, you will need to file a “motion to impute” with the court that issued your original child support order. You will also need to show that your ex has the ability to earn more income than they are currently earning.

When Should I Contact a Lawyer?

You should contact a lawyer if you have questions about child support or if you need help modifying a child support order. A lawyer can also help you if you are struggling to come to terms with a child support order. You can even get your order modified with the help of a child support lawyer if your situation calls for it. To protect your rights, it is best to contact our law firm as soon as you can. We can help you with your child support needs and more. Call us today at (501) 891-6000 to get the legal help you deserve.