Testimonials

five star review

Mr. Haubert is an outstanding attorney. I have had the pleasure of being represented by his office for over a year. In this time the firm has taken on exceedingly difficult tasks, and I am extremely grateful for Brandon Haubert for having the knowledge and experience to handle them flawlessly. The peace of mind that I receive from using the firm to protect my family's future is priceless. Anyone who is looking for a trust worthy, honest, and fair priced attorney should use Brandon Haubert. I truly believe that he cares about my family's future.

five star review

I really enjoyed meeting with Jessica and Brandon yesterday. It’s not the best circumstances, but they really put me at ease. They did an emergency filing for me which took a lot of stress off of me. I would really recommend wh Law.

five star review

Brandon and Jessica helped so much. They filed an emergency bankruptcy with $0 down and stopped my creditors fast. Stopping the stress was so worth it.

five star review

Courteous, knowledgeable, and helpful. They made a very difficult time a lot easier. I highly recommend them if you find yourself in need.

Chapter 7 Bankruptcy

A chapter 7 bankruptcy case does not involve having to repay all of your debts. Instead, the bankruptcy trustee gathers and sells your nonexempt assets and uses the money from those assets to pay people you owe money to. In addition, the Bankruptcy Code and Arkansas Law will allow you to keep certain “exempt” property. However, the trustee will liquidate any nonexempt property you have.

Who is eligible for Chapter 7 Bankruptcy? If you make below the amounts below you are not subject to the means test and you can file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

Free Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Petition and Schedules

(Arkansas Median Income for Family Size as of November 1, 2017)

1 Person Family     $42,546
2 Person Family     $52,621
3 Person Family     $58,931
4 Person Family     $66,712
5 Person Family     $75,112
6 Person Family     $83,512
7 Person Family     $91,912
8 Person Family     $100,312
9 Person Family     $108,712
10 Person Family   $117,112

If your household income is above the number above, you can still file Chapter 7 bankruptcy, if you pass the means test.

An individual cannot file under chapter 7 or any other chapter, however, if during the preceding 180 days a prior bankruptcy petition was dismissed due to the debtor’s willful failure to appear before the court or comply with orders of the court, or if the debtor voluntarily dismissed the previous case after creditors sought relief from the bankruptcy court to recover property upon which they hold liens. 11 U.S.C. §§ 109(g), 362(d) and (e). In addition, no individual may  file for bankruptcy under chapter 7 or any chapter of the Bankruptcy Code unless he or she has, within 180 days before filing, received credit counseling from an approved credit counseling agency either in an individual or group briefing. 11 U.S.C. §§ 109, 111. There are exceptions in emergency situations or where the U.S. trustee (or bankruptcy administrator) has determined that there are insufficient approved agencies to provide the required counseling. If a debt management plan is developed during required credit counseling, it must be filed with the court.

One of the primary purposes of bankruptcy is to discharge certain debts to give an honest individual debtor a “fresh start.” The debtor has no liability for discharged debts. That simply means that once the bankruptcy court has granted a discharge of your debts, you are no longer responsible for paying them.  In a chapter 7 case, however, a discharge is only available to individual debtors, not to partnerships or corporations. 11 U.S.C. § 727(a)(1). Although an individual chapter 7 case usually results in a discharge of debts, the right to a discharge is not absolute, and some types of debts are not discharged. Moreover, a bankruptcy discharge does not extinguish a lien on property.

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Chapter 13 Bankruptcy

Chapter 13 bankruptcy is also called a wage earner’s plan. It helps people with regular income to create a plan to repay all or part of their debts. If you are reaffirming debt in a Chapter 7, then your payment in a Chapter 13 may not be more than a Chapter 7, in fact it may be less.

Free Chapter 13 Bankruptcy Petition and Schedules

What will my payment be under a Chapter 13 bankruptcy payment plan?

This depends on several issues:

  1. What secured property (property they can take away if you don’t pay for it – houses and cars) do you want to keep and pay for? In the case of secured property there are two major options:
    1. Surrender the property back to the creditor and not pay anything;
    2.  Keep and pay for the property, and if it was purchased recently you have to pay the balance due plus interest, but you can lower the interest rate, or if you purchased a while ago (910 days for cars and 1 year for household goods), you only have to pay what you owe or what it is worth, whichever is less.
    3. With a house payment, there are three options:
      1.  If the payments are current, continue to pay it yourself and don’t pay it through the Chapter 13 plan; or
      2. Make the regular monthly payment through the plan, and if you are behind on the payment, catch up the payments in the plan. This way when the bankruptcy is over, you will be current and pick up and pay the normal monthly payment; or
      3.  Pay the balance in full within the plan.
  2. What is your Plan Length? The length of your plan can be a minimum of 36 months (3 years) and a maximum of 60 months (5 years). If you do not pass the means test and you are not paying everyone back in full, then the plan has to be 5 years.
  3. The calculation of your disposable income. Under the bankruptcy code your disposable income (how much money is left after you pay all of your necessary monthly bills) will be calculated, and you will have to pay at least that amount towards bankruptcy most of the time. There are exceptions. Also, courts typically allow debtors to keep an amount of money every month for entertainment purposes. Filing Chapter 13 bankruptcy does not mean you have to live like a pauper for the next five years.
  4. What priority debts do you have? Priority debts are things such as taxes, wages owed to others, alimony, and child support. All priority debts, except child support, must be paid in full within the life of the plan. All priority debts will be paid through the plan except child support. You will continue to pay child support however you are directed to do so by the court.
  5. What non-dischargeable debt do you have to repay?  Non-dischargeable debt can include student loans, punitive damages, judgements based on fraud, etc. Student loans are the most common.
    1. Remember, any unpaid amount plus interest and any collection fees will be due after you get out of Bankruptcy.  You have two options:
      1.  Ignore the student loan and pay nothing through the plan; or
      2.   Pay your normal monthly payment and catch up what you are behind.
  6. What leased property do you want to keep and pay for? More often than not, lease-purchases are not financially wise transactions.  If you have leased property, you have three (3) options:
    1. Reject the lease and let the creditor have the property back and pay them nothing;
    2. Accept the lease contract as written, and continue to pay them directly, not through the plan, if your payments are current; and
    3. Accept the lease contract as written, and pay it through the plan, and if you are behind on payments, catch those payments up through the plan.
  7. What debts do you owe jointly with other people who are not filing bankruptcy? You have two options:
    1.  Pay nothing towards the obligation and let the responsibility fall on the co-debtor or person who jointly owes the debt.
    2. Pay the debt in full inside the plan so your co-debtor does not have to pay.
  8. What non-exempt property must you pay the value of? If you own property that is not exempt, then you will pay the value of the property to the Trustee. If you file a Chapter 7, this property would be taken as well as sold by the trustee to pay your debts.

Why should I file Chapter 13 if I qualify for Chapter 7?

If you are behind on your payments and you want to keep that property, then you need to file Chapter 13 instead of Chapter 7. Chapter 13 lets you stop foreclosures and repossessions, and lets you catch up on your payments. If your car was recently repossessed, then you can get it back.

Chapter 13 may save you money. Sometimes you can lower the amount you owe on your car if you purchased the care more than 910 days before you file bankruptcy. Also, you can lower your interest rate on your loan.

What if you don’t have the money to pay a bankruptcy lawyer? A Chapter 13 is cheaper to file. When you file a Chapter 13, you make your payment to the bankruptcy trustee and they pay your lawyer fees.

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wh Law, is a debt relief agency. We help people file for bankruptcy protection under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.

Financial Freedom is a Phone Call Away

Bad things happen to good people. If you are having problems paying your bills and it has you stressed, worried, or uncertain; then we can help you get a fresh start. At wh Law | We Help, we have helped clients deal with debt problems. We can help save homes from foreclosure and automobiles from repossession.

501.891.6000

Bankrupty Blawgs

June 18, 2019

Bankruptcy and Unsecured Debt

Unsecured Debts Debts that are unsecured (e.g. credit cards, medical bills, etc.) are those which are not secured (secured means if you do not pay, the can repo or foreclose, e.g cars, house, etc.) anything you own. The creditor does not have a right to repossess anything if you don’t pay the debt. In general, it’s easier to deal with…

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June 4, 2019

New Law Could Allow Student Loans to be Discharged in Bankruptcy

Sen. Dick Durbin has proposed a new bill that has an escape clause for people with student loans that are forced to carry the debt to their graves. 44,000,00 Americans owe on student loans. The amount owed is more than $1.5 trillion. The only kind of dent that exceeds this figure is  credit card debt. The act is supported by…

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January 22, 2019

How to Stop Wage Garnishment

If your wages are currently being garnished, or if you are in danger of having them garnished, the attorneys at wh Law | We Help can stop the process.  We have attorneys who specialize in bankruptcy, who will use the bankruptcy code to prevent your wages from being taken from you, once and for all. A little known feature of…

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January 22, 2019

How to stop your car from being repossessed

Automobile dealers and lenders like to try and scare people into scrambling to make up behind payments by threatening to repossess a vehicle.  Don’t let yourself be fooled. When you are behind on payments and don’t know how to make them up, filing bankruptcy can give you more time to figure out how to get caught up on your payments. …

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January 22, 2019

How to stop Foreclosure

The attorneys here are WH Law all have families and small children, so we understand the importance a stable home has for a family. Don’t let your concerns about bankruptcy prevent you from keeping your home. Many attorneys don’t understand the ins and outs of the bankruptcy code, but we do. If you are behind on payments on your mortgage,…

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January 22, 2019

How to Stop Creditor Calls and Harassment

Creditor harassment is a major reason people seek bankruptcy assistance. Phone calls at home, work, threatening letters, lawsuits, garnishments, and bank seizures can make your life more difficult than it already is. When the creditor harassment is too much, call an experienced bankruptcy attorney and get some relief! Once you file your bankruptcy petition, all creditor harassment must stop immediately….

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January 22, 2019

How to deal with Credit Card debt

In most cases, if you have already decided to file for bankruptcy, continuing to make credit card payments is a waste of money. So,if you are going to file bankruptcy, then you should probably stop paying your credit cards. But if you are still undecided about bankruptcy or may not file your case for a long time, stopping your credit…

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January 22, 2019

How to deal with medical bills

There’s no such thing as a “medical bankruptcy”. Even though you’re filing a bankruptcy case to get rid of overwhelming medical debt, you won’t be able to limit the case to just outstanding medical bills. The bankruptcy laws are designed to be as fair as possible to the debtor (the person who files the bankruptcy case) and to the creditors….

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January 22, 2019

How to deal with past taxes

If you’re thinking of filing bankruptcy because of heavy tax debts, there are some things you need to know before doing so.  The Bankruptcy Code makes it pretty difficult for you to get your tax debts discharged, because the government’s trying to get paid.  However, it is possible to get some of your tax debts wiped out.  You just have…

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December 31, 2018

What is Exempt in Bankruptcy?

This is question everyone asks and for good reason. Everyone is worried about keeping their property and we don’t blame them. You worked hard for it. Most states require you to use state exemptions when you file for bankruptcy. Arkansas allows you to choose between Arkansas or Federal exemptions. However, you must pick one system or the other (you cannot…

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December 24, 2018

Your Privacy and Bankruptcy

It should not be a surprise to anyone that one of the most important concerns of those considering filing for bankruptcy is privacy. It is true that bankruptcy is public information. Like most court cases, they are public record, you can view court records and sometimes newspapers publish notice of legal filings. Even though Bankruptcies are a public record they…

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December 17, 2018

Bankruptcy | Student Loans and other Unforgivable Debts

It’s one of the most commonly asked student loan questions: Can you discharge your student loans in bankruptcy? The short answer: normally no, student loans are not dischargeable. Student loans are now the second highest consumer debt category – behind mortgages, but ahead of credit card debt. Unlike other consumer debt such as credit card and mortgage debt, however, student…

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